studio exercise 7

Zinnia Upson

10/22/17

Theory

Exercise #7

 

This week’s reading influenced my exercise this week beginning with Bourriaud’s comment on luxury items and how because of mass production of objects, luxury items became less and less especially in an urban environment. He also talks about “The general mechanization of the social functions (and how it is) reducing our relational space.” (Bourriaud, 162) This means that services humans once provided are now being replaced by technology. In this case language that was once taught by professors and teachers is easily replaced by Rosetta stones and translation websites and so is my item, the pocket dictionary. Once a commodity easily bought by the wages that most could afford is now being substituted by a pricey luxury program that few can afford. I also incorporated Sol LeWitt’s style by having the word “Dictionary” directly placed across the painting of the dictionary to define what it is that the viewer is engaging with. By outlining what the viewer is to observe shows how linguistics turn a piece of work performative, giving the viewer the same authorship as the artist- explained in the textbook by Weiner ““the owner of the work contributes to what the material status of the work will be to the very same extent as the producer” (606) in which case the viewer is the owner. I came up with my idea to paint a vague representation of the dictionary so that it was obvious enough what I was trying to produce due to the outside knowledge of the class of what my object was but then decided to use linguistics to prove what it was and then wanted to find a way to show wage as a factor. I used the scan code from the back of the dictionary and simply placed it on “the front” page of the dictionary in my representation of the dictionary. There is a heavy use of Semiotics and code on this piece because of the assumption that this piece would not be autonomous and prior knowledge would be required to identify my object in my piece.

 

 

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